Two apartment buildings approved on Garfield Avenue

Garfield developments
Garfield developments

Two projects that will add 79 new apartments along Garfield Avenue were approved by the city’s planning commission on June 17.

The projects, a six-story, 67-unit building at 28th & Garfield and a three-story, 12-unit building at 33rd & Garfield, were both approved on consent agenda without comment.

The building at 28th & Garfield is a Yellow Tree development that will include an automated stacking garage feature for parking. A total of 40 parking spots and 40 bike parking stalls would go in the building.

There is a 12-unit apartment building currently on the site that would be removed. Yellow Tree co-founder Robb Lubenow previously told the Southwest Journal they had offered to move residents of the building into a similar building the firm owns at 28th & Harriet.

The building will have nine studio, 33 one-bedroom and 10 two-bedroom apartments. Two walk-up units are planned along Garfield.

The Whittier Alliance wrote in support of the project, expressing appreciation for Yellow Tree’s landscaping plan, a proposed mural along 28th Street and walk-up units. However, the neighborhood association expressed its displeasure for the proposed orange coloring on the building and its concern that new developments may price out current residents.

“While we appreciate and acknowledge that proposed rents for this project are at entry-level market-rate [area median income] levels, they will still likely be out of reach for the majority of households in Whittier,” the neighborhood organization wrote in a letter to the planning commission.

The proposal at 33rd & Garfield in Lyndale will add 12 housing units to the site of a vacant substation.

The development, dubbed the Amp House by a company of the same name, proposed no vehicle parking on the site. Commissioners approved the developer’s request to divide the property into two lots, with the 12-unit building on one lot and a landscaped community and shared garden space on the other.

The building, designed by Christian Dean Architects, would be brick, glass and metal pane.

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